Tinder Down $17M in Age Discrimination Suit

Tinder Down $17M in Age Discrimination Suit

TINDER SETTLES OUT OF COURT IN UGLY AGE DISCRIMINATION SUIT

Age discrimination happens all the time.  Anyone over 40 is aware that it’s real, and that it might be just over the horizon for them.  It all depends on what sector you work in.  But age discrimination also affects the marketplace.  But this time, it affected anyone over the tender age of 29 years old!  Shame on you, Tinder.  That’s right, Tinder forced anyone over the age of 29 to pay double the price of younger folks for their premium service, Tinder Plus.  This stinks no matter how you score your card (or your belt).  It stinks to the tune of $17M, in fact. That’s how much they settled the law suit for.

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TINDER PLUS SUBSCRIPTION SERVICE CHARGED ANYONE 29 YEARS OR OLDER DOUBLE THE PRICE

So in case you’ve been under a rock in recent years, Tinder is a dating app that has subscription services.  In 2015 they launched an app service, Tinder Plus.  Basic Tinder dating services were still free.  But free Tinder limited how many user profiles you could see every day.  So for just $9.99 a month, you could view however many you wanted, as well as some other options users might enjoy.  But there was just one major problem.  If you were 29 years old or (heaven forfend!) even older, Tinder Plus cost you $19.99.  Oops.  Well, not oops.  That’s really shitty of you, Tinder.

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TINDER UNAPOLOGETIC, DENY DISCRIMINATION, BUT SETTLE FOR $17M

So sure, it’s easy to joke about how people might pay Tinder to help them screw in the social marketplace.  But it’s not so much fun when you pay Tinder to get screwed, and not in the way you want to.  Tinder tried to hide behind their pricing by claiming that younger people were excited about Tinder but couldn’t afford the “older” price range.  But what’s more likely is that they saw an opportunity to maximize their profits with age discrimination.  The obviousness of this is why they just settled a class action suit for $17.25 million.  They could call this case the Catcher in the Why?

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