Mother in Japan Confesses to Smothering Kids in Concrete

Mother in Japan Confesses to Smothering Kids in Concrete

4 INFANT BABIES, 4 BUCKETS FILLED WITH CONCRETE

Four infant remains were found in buckets of concrete this week in Osaka, Japan.  Mayumi Saito, the mother of the four infants, confessed to the devastating acts, which led officials to finding the dead bodies. The Osaka resident recently confessed to the police that she placed each child in buckets filled with cement because she was too poor to care for them and did not know what else to do.  She said that she suffocated her babies with the concrete through the years of 1992 and 1997.  It is uncertain to authorities if the babies were stillborn or alive at the time of the smothering. The Osaka police officials requested anonymity due to department rules.

SINGLE MOTHER, RESIDING WITH HER SON, SMOTHERING KIDS

Prior to her arrest on Tuesday, the 53-year-old mother had been residing with her son in a high-rise condominium.  She has a part-time job but no further information was available at the time.  Nor commentary from her family or friends were obtainable.  She has been charged with the abandonment of bodies and conceivably other charges will follow.

It is common in Japan for further charges, particularly criminal charges, to be added after an investigation ensues and develops.  Smothering kids in concrete is sure to demand a lot of public attention.

Read More:

Nut Ball Lived a Year with Bodies of Mother and Twin Brother

JAPAN NOTED FOR LACK OF SOCIAL SUPPORTS, ESPECIALLY OSAKA

Japan’s economy is regarded as one of the highest, but despite its reputation of being economically progressive, poverty continues to be an immense issue amongt women specifically. There are also areas in Osaka that are considered to be slums such as in Kamagasaki. Which suffers a trend of alcoholism, abuse and welfare.

Related:

Jefferson Powell, Duke Law School Professor Implicated in Racial Profiling, Fraud

Furthermore, the woman in particular are the hardest hit.  Social services and support such as affordable day cares for working mothers and accessible counseling for stress leading to mental health issues is challenging for women to get in Japan.  The media in Japan reported that Mayumi Saito told them she had no one to speak to and no one to turn to.

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Show Buttons
Hide Buttons