Mich. Farm Owner Learns Meteorite Doorstop Worth 100 Grand

Mich. Farm Owner Learns Meteorite Doorstop Worth 100 Grand

MICH. DOORSTOP WAS REALLY WORTH 100 GRAND

The odds of winning the lottery are abysmal.  You might as well go out in a rubber suit on a sunny day hoping to get struck by lightning.  You’d have a better chance.  But people pay for the momentary dream.  Yet sometimes their little, or not so little, nest egg was right at their door the whole time.  That was literally true for a man from Michigan, for decades.  He recently found out that that funky looking stone he’s used as a doorstop is actually a meteorite.  It’s worth about $100,000!  How’s that for walking by your dreams, every day, over and over again?  But at least he found out at last.  The 22-pound rock is no diamond, but it’s still worth a pretty penny.  Or ten million Mich. pennies, that is.

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METEORITE DOORSTOP CAME WITH THE FARM IN 1988

The man has asked to remain anonymous, which isn’t too surprising.  Neighbors can be a bother.  He bought (the) his farm in 1988, with the random bid rock as part of the ambiance.  The farm is in Edmore, Michigan.  That’s roughly 30 miles south and west of Mount Pleasant.  When the farmer who sold him the farm was showing him around, he asked about the big, weird rock that was used as a doorstop.  The farmer told him, “a meteorite.”  He explained that in the 1930s he and his father actually saw it come down and land on their property “and it made a heck of a noise when it hit.”  The next morning they found the crater it made and dug out the still warm, celestial speck.

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HE BOUGHT THE FARM, AND WON 30 YEARS LATER

So the farmer considered it a part of the property and included it in the sale.  But for some reason the anonymous man only this year took it to someone to examine.  He took it to Mona Sirbescu, a geologist at Central Mich. University.  She examined the rock and determined it is 88% iron and 12% nickel.  She proved it was authentic.  The Smithsonian’s analysis confirmed it was so.  So why the recent curiosity?  A recent meteor event in Michigan had everyone talking.  Meteorite hunters had descended on the state hunting space gold, or meteorites.  The man learned that they can sell for between 50 cents to $5 a gram.  Some go for more.  His went for $10 a gram!

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