Livestream This Year’s Summer Solstice At the Ancient Stonehenge

Livestream Summer Solstice At the Ancient Stonehenge

YOU CAN LIVESTREAM THIS YEAR’S SUMMER SOLSTICE IN ENGLAND FROM ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD

Summer Solstice is right around the corner.  Wait, what?  You don’t know what that is?  It’s the longest day of the year.  In other words, the sun rises at the earliest time, and sets at the latest.  It’s the opposite of the shortest day of the year. Duh.  So this year Summer Solstice is on June 21st, just under a month away.  Already!  Many people celebrate the day in a variety of ways.  They’ve done so, in fact, throughout history.  And this year will be no exception!  And you can, too, in a new way.  You can livestream Summer Solstice at Stonehenge!

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BECAUSE OF COVID-19, NO ONE CAN GATHER FOR THIS YEAR’S SUMMER SOLSTICE AT STONEHENGE

Sigh.  What?  You don’t know Stonehenge?  Well, for one, it’s in England.  Tons of people go there every year to celebrate the day.  And yes, it’s quite a scene.  We’re talking today’s druids and pagans and who knows what else.  Wiccans?  Sure.  But this year we’ve got Coronavirus.  That means no gatherings.  Certainly no crowds at Stonehenge on Summer Solstice day.  Stonehenge will not be open for some time.  And June 21st is no exception.  So livestreaming is the only answer!  Sure, it’s virtual.  But it’s the modern day, right?  Even for witches!

Related:

https://www.theblot.com/stupid-corona-beer/

STONEHENGE DRAWS A CROWD EVERY YEAR, AS PREHISTORIC SITE IS STILL A TOTAL MYSTERY

Stonehenge is a prehistoric site.  And yes, that means we don’t know too much about it.  Well, except that it’s important.  Maybe it was a burial site, among other things.  But days like Summer Solstice always bring crowds there.  It has a ring of really large stones in a ring.  Each is about 13 feet high and about 7 feet wide, weighing 25 tons.  And no, we don’t know how people built it, or got the stones there.  But they clearly had stones.  It’s been there since between 3,000 and 2,000 BC.  So do the math.  It’s 4 to 5 thousand years old.  So it’s likely that people have gathered there on Summer Solstice that entire time.

This year, you can too.  From a distance.  So thanks a lot, Covid.

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