Tragedy As Tree That Inspired Dr. Seuss The Lorax is Dead

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Tragedy As Tree That Inspired Dr Seuss The Lorax is Dead

MONTEREY CYPRESS TREE THAT INSPIRED THE LORAX BY DR. SEUSS IS NO MORE

So this is some seriously sad news.  Of course, everyone knows who Dr. Seuss is.  So too, pretty much everyone has at least heard of his children’s book, The Lorax, from 1971.  But like so much of his stories, they remain timeless regardless of when he wrote them.  So it’s really sad to hear that a major piece of Dr. Seuss’ living history is no more.  The Monterey Cypress tree that inspired The Lorax has just died.  Experts believe the tree was 80-100 years old.  The tree had grown and resided in the Ellen Browning Scripps Park, located in La Jolla, California.

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DR. SEUSS COULD SEE THIS TREE FROM HIS HOME FOR 43 YEARS, INSPIRED TREE PROTECTOR STORY, THE LORAX

So Dr. Seuss, you see, lived in the picturesque oceanside community from 1948 up until he passed away in 1991.  His full name was Theodor Seuss Geisel.  Geisel had been able to see the amazing tree from elevated, mountaintop home.  So far, there’s no clear understanding why the tree collapsed and died.  According to Tim Graham, a spokesperson for the San Diego Parks and Recreation Department, there is “no definitive cause on why it fell.”  So, so sad.  But the City of San Diego has plans to repurpose the large remainder of the trunk into something else.  So hopefully, they’ll repurpose it into something we all get to enjoy for some time.

Related: California Couple Fined $600,000 for Cutting Down Ancient Oak Tree

SAN DIEGO PLANS TO REPURPOSE THE MAIN TRUNK INTO SOMETHING ELSE TO REMEMBER, AND VISIT

The authorities have already removed the bulk of the fallen tree.  The large trunk remaining is set to become…. something else.  So if, somehow, you aren’t too familiar with the story of the Lorax, it’s a good one and now somewhat ironic.  The Lorax character does his best to defend a fictional type of trees Geisel named the Truffula trees.  But it’s also a story of all the living things that lived in and depended on the trees.  So who were threatening the trees?  The greed of corporations, of course.  If you want an easy, fun evening, check out the animated version of the book from 2012.

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