What not to Say in a Job Interview

Hiring Manager Howie Kaye Tells You What Not to Say in an Interview

EXPERT HIRING MANAGER WILL SET YOU STRAIGHT

Employers use interviews to determine if you’re the right person for a job. But you could tank your chances fast with a hiring manager by using the wrong words and phrases, says Howie Kaye an expert hiring mananger who has conducted more than 15,000 interviews.

BS WALKS EXPERINCE TALKS

With over 30 years of human resource experience at fortune 500 companies like Lehman Brothers and Chase Bank, Kaye says these are the certain words and phrases that should be eliminated from your interview vocabulary. Here you go:

‘YOU GUYS’ USED BY ROOKIES

Kaye hears this phrase most often used by recent college graduates. Typically, they’ve never interviewed for or worked in a corporate environment, the rookies.
“They talk like they’re talking to one of their buddies,” he tells TheBlot “They’re just so used to talking that way. “However, saying “you guys” is much too informal and sounds like slang, says Kaye. “It drives me nuts.” Instead, he suggests referring to the company by its actual name or saying “your firm” or even just “your company.”

‘PERFECTIONIST’, KAYE SAYS YOU ARE NOT

“I wanted to get ill after I heard this [word] so many times,” says Kaye. “It’s too cliche.” He adds to this list other descriptors like “hard-worker” and “people-pleaser. “Not only do these words hold little weight, says Drexler, but they also won’t help you stand out because everyone else is using these words to describe themselves.
“Cliches are awful,” says the interview expert. “I’d avoid those.”

‘COMFORTABLE’

Don’t use the word “comfortable” when answering questions about why you want a specific role, type of job or position. “The word ‘comfortable’ is the kiss of death when it comes to careers,” says Kaye.
Your potential employer doesn’t want a comfortable employee, he says, because it insinuates that you aren’t a hard worker and that you’ll take whatever comes easy. Kaye suggests saying that you want a challenging role or a stimulating role. “You want something that’s rewarding, not comfortable,” he adds.

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