The GPGP is Real and It is Killing Marine Life

The GPGP is Real and It's Killing Marine Life

THE GREAT PACIFIC GARBAGE PATCH IS REAL

The Pacific Ocean is beautiful, great surfing, swimming, and bathing.  It’s even better served as a massive dumpster, or at least that’s how we are treating it.  The giant floating island AKA The Great Pacific Garbage Patch, AKA GPGP is now claimed to cover over 600,000 square miles. To put that in perspective, it’s three times bigger than France and is apparently growing larger by the day.

ENVIRONMENTALISTS UPSET GPGP DOUBLES IN SIZE

Environmentalists are pissed about the massive dumpster and expressed their concerns over a year ago in October 2016, after a team of researchers from The Ocean Cleanup Foundation visited the whirlpool of trash piling up in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. The size of the garbage patch pile has doubled in size since then. Researchers gathered over a million samples during the latest expedition in October 2017, about a year after the last visit.

LARGE PLASTIC IS PUBLIC ENEMY #1

Large items such as bottles, ropes, plastic bags and buoys were the most common objects spotted in the GPGP. Fishing nets had an overwhelming presence, accounting for nearly half of the weight of debris picked up by research vessels. “We were surprised by the amount of large plastic objects we encountered,” Dr. Julia Reisser, the chief scientist of the expeditions, said in a statement online. “We used to think most of the debris consists of small fragments, but this new analysis shines a new light on the scope of the debris.” Data from the fishing nets proved more plastic is coming into the ocean than being cleaned up. But scientists didn’t realize how fast garbage was piling up.

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POLLUTION IS RUINING THE MARINE LIFE POPULATION

Pollution is problematic for the environment and humans, but it’s especially troubling for marine life. Floating plastic litter can be ingested or entangle marine life, and carry invasive organisms across oceanic basins. They hope to find a way to curb plastic waste. “We need a coordinated international effort to rethink and redesign the way we use plastics,” he said. “The numbers speak for themselves. Things are getting worse and we need to act now.”

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